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Sports Think Tank - EU Brexit

"A sports think tank would be a great legacy from the 2012 games, enabling future generations to benefit from long term, well researched, and evidence-based sports policy making in the UK" Seb Coe

Sports Think Tank

Sports Think Tank

Address
31-32 Bedford Street
Covent Garden
London
WC2E 9ED
Telephone
+44 20 3239 3380
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http://www.sportsthinktank.com

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The EU Referendum decision to leave the EU is a landmark moment in the political history of the United Kingdom. The consequences of the decision to withdraw will have far reaching consequences for the sector

The Sports Think Tank invites evidence, views and opinion on the matter from stakeholders across the sport sector and beyond.

We are working with Loughborough University Institute of Sport Business and the Sport Industry Group to ensure the voice of Sport is heard and understood in the negotiations with the EU on the terms of withdrawal and what replaces our current membership.

We need the sector to come together and make the case for access to the Single Market and the positive consequences of our membership. We invite examples of impact and what we need to see the Government EU unit preparing their negotiations.

We are working with government through DCMS to gather the thoughts and issues on behalf of the sector. Following initial soundings up to Christmas we hope to do a fuller consultation in the new year with your suport!


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PM Statement to Parliament - 27th June 2016

The Prime Minister made the following statement to the House of Commons on Monday 27th June and launched the EU team in the Cabinet Office to oversee the complex negotiations for the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/pm-commons-statement-on-the-result-of-the-eu-referendum-27-june-2016


Article 50 and our Withdrawal

Timeline and Article 50

Next few days 24th June onwards

In the European Union, the six founding members of the bloc will meet in Berlin on Saturday 25 2016. There may also be an emergency meeting of finance ministers over the weekend and technical work will begin at the level of officials.

Prime Minister David Cameron will then travel to Brussels next week to meet with EU leaders to discuss the UK situation.
He will not start of the secession process under Article 50 of the EU treaty whilst in post confirming this will be up to the country's next prime minister
However, no serious negotiation can start until Britain decides how it wants to conduct the exit and what arrangements it will request afterwards.

Article 50 and settlement options

Article 50 provides a two-year negotiating period with the departing Member State, but there is a general consensus that this will need to be extended for the UK's departure.

Whilst Vote Leave have suggested a new settlement - including a UK-EU free trade deal - would be possible by May 2020, it is unlikely that two years will be long enough to work out the more complex trading accords and talks are likely to continue several years after officially leaving the EU. There are three broad options talked about:

The Norwegian Model


By staying in the looser European Economic Area, the UK would still have access to the EU's single market and participate in free movement of workers but without any say in how they evolve. The country would still contribute to the EU budget. As reported, banks prefer this model because it would preserve their access to EU customers. New Deal
Negotiating its own free-trade agreement would limit most trade tariffs between the UK and the 27nation bloc. However it could take years to work out the extent of Britain's market access. For example, the EU's trade agreement with Canada took seven years to negotiate and still isn't ratified.

WTO Rules
Trading with the EU under World Trade Organization (WTO) rules would avoid the hassle of setting up a complex new agreement and the country could set its own trade tariffs. However, the UK would have no favorable relationship with the EU or any other country.